rod weights

Discussion of sea fishing rods, boat, beach, surf casting and spinning rods.
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geordiesandman
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rod weights

Post by geordiesandman »

when i'm looking at spinning rods, they are classed in x-y grms (eg 30-60) i presume this signifies the weight of the spinner that it can cope with so in this example anything between 30 and 60 grams. but would it cope with lighter, like a 20 gram??

or am i totaly wrong??

graham



Clarissa
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Post by Clarissa »

The 'from - to' ratings are designed to tell you the range of leads the rod will cast. To be honest, if you look at beachcasters which say 4 - 8oz, the optimum will be somewhere in the middle of the range.

Your spinning rod will gladly handle the lighter weight lure, but may not be fully compressed by that lure for distance.

Always choose a rod to suit the mid-range rating, and you shouldn't go far wrong.

B-)

geordiesandman
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Post by geordiesandman »

thanks, that makes sense.

so if i am spinning, the weight of the spinner is what is relevant.... is there aa huge diversity in this weight? is the size/weight of the spinner gouverned by the target species? if so what would you suggest i b targeting/using in the north east (tyneside)

graham

fishhunter
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Post by fishhunter »

loads of different weights of spinners out there mate also try tobys and dexter wedges or try spinning a jelly worm or firetail worm using a 3-4 foot length of mono tied to size 3/0 hook with a swivel on the other end.
slide a one ounce drilled bullet weight up the mainline then tie mainline to the swivel.
Then slide the head of jelly worm over the hook point and all the way up to the eye then pull the tail so as to expose the hook point.
This should appeal to pollack at rock marks and probably most of the fish around that coast which are predatory.
Lots of different colours available as well and silver or chrome will take macky when they are in.

Hope i have been of some help to you

Fishhunter

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Post by fishhunter »

forgot to say that my own spinning rod is the same 20-60g and i tend to usuallyuse lures/tobys or wedges about 28g as this casts well and will sink so you can cover varying depths of water to find the fish.

geordiesandman
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Post by geordiesandman »

i'm still a bit confused about rod ratings, especially as i'm now looking at and trying out new types of rod.
A spinnning rod, bass rod is rated from g - to g
a beach rod is rated from oz - to oz
a boat rod is rated lb class
a carp rod is rated by its test curve.

what do these all refer to. the spinning, beach rod is with reference to the weight it can cast.. the test curve, is the weight that will pull the rod tip to 90 degrees, and that then relates to line weight? the rest ?????? i'm lost

graham

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Post by Iknowagoodplaice »

Really all these different gradings measure the stiffness of the rod, but the tendency to use metric values for spinning rods does seem odd - certainly a little irritating. The different measures are historical I suppose: freshwater rods were always expressed in test curves, or at least the heavier leger rods were. Float rods never had any such measure.

eccles
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Post by eccles »

Boat rods are a bit of an exception in that the lb rating refers to the breaking strain of the line one would normally use. E.g. A lot of guys use 20lb class rods indicating that one would normally use 18-20 lb line, commonly used breaking strains when wreck fishing for bigger cod, bass and pollack. On the other hand if one were expecting tope or conger, you would go up to a 30-40lb class rod and so on.

geordiesandman
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Post by geordiesandman »

so if i have a 2.5lb test curve rod, how does that equate to casting weight/ line weight?

strathy
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Post by strathy »

With carp and other freshwater style rods you should multiply the test curve by 5 to find the maximum recomended hooklink strength.
So a 2,1/2 lb test curve means max hooklink of 12,1/2 lbs BS.
General casting wieght recomendation is 1oz / lb Test curve so 2,1/2 lb rod should be able to cast a 2,1/2 oz total lead and bait. Some will handle more if only a gentle short range lob cast is used.

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Post by eccles »

Thanks for that Strathy, I now understand a lot more about carp rods and it seems to me that a 2.5 pound test curve rod would be about right for mackerel feathers or lures but not up to chucking a 5 or 6oz sinker and bait 100 odd yards out into the briny.

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Post by strathy »

eccles wrote:Thanks for that Strathy, I now understand a lot more about carp rods and it seems to me that a 2.5 pound test curve rod would be about right for mackerel feathers or lures but not up to chucking a 5 or 6oz sinker and bait 100 odd yards out into the briny.
You need a 5,1/2 lb TC Spod rod for 5oz or more.
The 5x calculation , and oz/lb is based on the old Greenheart / split cane rods ratings and I think is probably still a good way of rating even modern carbon rods to give you a safe casting weight. It would definately save a few shops and manufacturers a lot of money on broken returned rods if they still followed the formula.
I,ve seen a few expensive carp rods break when used with big pva bags that were way overweight for the rod.

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