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multipliers

Posted: Sun Apr 24, 2011 5:51 pm
by Rayman5

Posted: Sun Apr 24, 2011 6:42 pm
by eccles
This debate goes on for ever but I am happy to join in again. Decent modern fixed spools such as Daiwas can cast quite a long way. I can chuck mine well over 100 yds and that's not doing pendulum so I stick to FS (at my age) - I would hate to have to deal with birds nests at night too which is when I do half my fishing. On the other hand if you really need to emulate the tourney casters with pendulum style you had better find someone who will teach you but bear in mind that most fish are taken at 50 to 80 yds at night which is all that I am interested in.

Posted: Sun Apr 24, 2011 10:44 pm
by redmouse

Posted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 6:47 am
by rabbi2

Posted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 11:06 am
by Iknowagoodplaice
It's possible that the spool is slipping under your thumb as you make the cast, or you're briefly touching the spool shortly after release - both can lead to overruns. Quite possible as you say it only happens with hard casting.

Posted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 11:18 am
by Rayman5
Thanks for all the advice, will look into all options. once again thanks. Just looked on e bay at the abu elite look quite reasonably priced. got a birthday coming up might look at getting one

Posted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 9:10 pm
by andy1_i
remember its smooth progressive casting that does the trick,start off slow,you have to put F/S style behind you and have to learn a completely new technique. try slowing your reel down.dont put so much power into your cast,distance will come with time after technique. dave docwra does a superb dvd,"surfcasting further" or something like that,i can PM the details of how to get it if you want,best tenner i ever spent

all the best

Andy

Posted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:15 am
by redmouse
if you decide on an abu 6500 make sure you get an older green one. not made anymore and only available 2nd hand. their much better quality than the newer ones, cheaper and better to learn on.
another one to look at if you wanted a new reel is the newer akios 656ctm. havent seen a bad review of them yet. their meant to be a newer abu 6500, yesterdays quality with modern technology is their slogan :D .
dont touch anything with a level wind tho, might seem a good idea but you will regret it after a few weeks.

Posted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:42 am
by rabbi2
I was under the impression that a conversion bar was available so as to dispense with the level wind at a later date. Oh well perhaps I'm wrong.
Cheers
keith :D :D

Posted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 12:07 pm
by redmouse
rabbi2 wrote:I was under the impression that a cinverion bar was available so as to dispense with the level wind at a later date. Oh well perhaps I'm wrong.
Cheers
keith :D :D
your right there keith but its more expence to buy and get fitted, most people get the hang of laying the line manually after a few sessions anyway so unless fishing from a boat, level winds are not needed.

Posted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 12:26 pm
by Rayman5
Andy,
Would apprciate the details or link, I do most of my fishing from clacton and i need all the distance i can get there. Advice taken on board as well from what i can gather practise is the key. will get out and practise more. Is therer a better technique for multipliers i just use the basic over the head or if im feeling brave OTG.

Will also take a look at the akios that redmouse suggested. once again Thanks for all the advice

Posted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 9:58 am
by Beretta28g
Why do you need a brake?

Just learn to control your thumb and with practice you should not have any problems.

I use Penn Squidders without the fins and dont have any problems.

Posted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:24 pm
by Boxerman
Beretta28g wrote:Why do you need a brake?

Just learn to control your thumb and with practice you should not have any problems.

I use Penn Squidders without the fins and dont have any problems.
When I started using multis I had a Mitchell 602AP - no brake except your thumb. I went from that to an Abu 6500 with centrifugal brakes and then to an Abu mag elite with centrifugal and magnetic braking. I also have a Sl30sh (with centrifugal brakes)
The modern reels are much, much easier to use and are much freer running than the old ones. The old reels spools ran on bushes whereas modern reels have ball races.

I still have the 602 but I only use it when I fancy a bit of masochism.

Posted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:49 pm
by rabbi2
If I remember rightly there was a a 602 then a 602AP the later being wider spool, then the 624 boat reel. They was a knack to then especialy with the spool being made of metal, they seemed to run on forever.
Cheers
keith :D :D

Posted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 2:03 pm
by Boxerman
rabbi2 wrote:If I remember rightly there was a a 602 then a 602AP the later being wider spool, then the 624 boat reel. They was a knack to then especialy with the spool being made of metal, they seemed to run on forever.
Cheers
keith :D :D
The 602AP had a quick take apart feature where you could take the sideplate off by releasing 4 thumb screws and leaving the cage intact. The "normal" version (not AP) came to bits if you took the sideplate off. The wide spool version (in both normal and AP configurations) was the 600. They had fibreglass spools (and came with a spare) as standard but you could buy metal spools for boat fishing. Many people say that the fibreglass spools used to implode but I never had that problem and still have both my spools.

As you say, the 624 was a boat reel.