THIS COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE!

Anything East Coast Sea fishing related here

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geordiesandman
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Post by geordiesandman »

Iknowagoodplaice wrote:Just to add my proviso about the 112 number that disappeared during the changeover.

No signal (ie no bars on phone screen) means you will be out of touch of any network.

Triangulation only works when you are in radio sight of at least 2 masts. Phones are not like one of those GPS gizmos. Be aware of this in remote locations.
does this apply to mobile phones that have gps?



Southender
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Post by Southender »

geordiesandman wrote:
Iknowagoodplaice wrote:Just to add my proviso about the 112 number that disappeared during the changeover.

No signal (ie no bars on phone screen) means you will be out of touch of any network.

Triangulation only works when you are in radio sight of at least 2 masts. Phones are not like one of those GPS gizmos. Be aware of this in remote locations.
does this apply to mobile phones that have gps?
I am not sure if you have to have gps installed on your phone.

geordiesandman
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Post by geordiesandman »

I've started looking into the 112 emergency number as i have a few questions regarding how it works and i'm not 100% sure of the facts.

Dont shoot me yet as i/we need to look a bit deeper first...

Some sites say it is an 'efiction' myth. (though i dont think this is true)

however another site tells me that 112 is only an EU emergency number that is recognised by all member states and is also available on 'GSM' mobile phones that are within a mobile network (not necesarily thier own)

remember not all mobiles are GSM phones (some of the cheep pay as you go ones may not be)

i'm not sure wether the band width of the phone has any bearing. what happens outside the EU (as some international networks are owned by european companies and vice versa).

also in the uk 999 would work from any mobile phone anyway.

still not too sure about the glocator though....

i'll look further into this when i get a bit time

Iknowagoodplaice
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Post by Iknowagoodplaice »

I'm not an expert on this so you need to do your own research to be sure. Anyway, as far as I know, most mobile phones do not provide GPS positioning. A GPS device communicates directly with the network of satellites to give a lat and long location.

Mobile phones are usually located with respect to ground stations (masts). If there are enough masts this can be reasonable accurate, though not "pinpoint".

It is possible for mobiles to have a GPS unit, in which case it determines its location then sends this to its ground network. How many mobiles have this feature I do not know.

Take a look at this Wiki page for more info.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone_tracking

Tonyb2
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Post by Tonyb2 »

squidhead wrote:How about some kind of panic alarm or a whistle. I have both, and thank god never had to use them yet.
Martyn
Cheap version of this is a battery window alarm
In most DIY shops at a couple of quid for 4
They make one hell of a racket

andy1_i
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Post by andy1_i »

some superb things listed here,i promise to get around to condensing it all,i have been rushed off my feet lately.so bear with me guys/gals

all the best

stay safe

Andy

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keeping safe

Post by tony1 »

in the winter take a small disposable bbq only cheap at end of summer but well worth takin keeps you warm and last for agood few hours also good for boiling water on if you have a old camping kettle

dannypanter
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safety points

Post by dannypanter »

I always carry 2 large red blue and green cylumes as they are easier seen than hi vis and float and can be used for ease of detection from land sea or air plus allowing blue ones to drift in the tide will indicate currents and tidal movements, i seen this used for real and it works!!

danny

SeaSickSmiffy
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Post by SeaSickSmiffy »

Some basic boat safety tips:

Always wear a life jacket.

Before you set off tell someone where approximately you are going and what time you approximately expect to be back.

Carry an anchor, flares, spare fuel, oars/auxilliary engine.

Assuming you have a VHF radio fitted monitor Ch 16 for any urgent weather updates. Do a radio check before getting too far out to ensure you are transmitting correctly.

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tensenervoushaddock
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Post by tensenervoushaddock »

about removing footwear.....

I would like to know which variation of natural laws of buoyancy will cause my trainers, which will float, to drag me immediately to the sea bed should I find myself in the sea with them on.

The old story about shoes, boots, waders dragging you to your doom is an old wives tale with no basis in fact..

If I swim back to the rocks, I would want something on my feet to enable me to climb them...... you might as well drown out to sea than struggle to the rocks and drown there.

joliroger

Post by joliroger »

Don't know about trainers maybe your right but regarding chest waders put a pair on and jump in then tell me they don't drag you to the bottom.
Only joking! because I guarantee they will drag you to the bottom, seen it with my own eyes, the guy died.



JOLI .... :D

dontcatchmuch

Post by dontcatchmuch »

hi andy
as far as i can see most things have been mentioned other than bait digging ,i cant dig my own due to medical reasons but ive seen 5 peaple have to be rescued in the last 2 years 3 of them by my son,2 of which were very very lucky to make it ,im only comenting on the thames estuay but i asume it could be the same anywere
they got there slfs stuck in the soft mud/sand when digging lug cos they dident know the safe walk ways out to the worm beds or were digging in to soft a spot
so make sure you get or find out the corect walk way and corect place to dig before you try digging
ps what a bloody good post and idea this is andy well done mate
steve
pps if like me your disabled in anyway dont give up your fishing just be that bit more carfull and if in dout about something dont do it or ask a fellow angler even if you dont know them ive never been turned down yet when ive ask for help most are only to willing to help

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tensenervoushaddock
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Post by tensenervoushaddock »

chest waders full of water... and in water...cannot pull you to the bottom. The water in the waders weighs the same as the water outside, there is no difference in weight so no force acting to make you sink. Complete old wives tale.
If you try to pull someone out of the water that has waders full of water.... then that's a different story as the water weighs far more than the air around it.

It's complete tosh, why do I bother with a heavy anchor and chain when an old pair of waders ( which would by themselves float), by your reckoning would zoom to the bottom and hold the dinghy quite adequately ?

What is it about the human body ( that floats ), that makes waders ( that float ) rush to the bottom of the ocean when they are put on?
Imagine if I were floating in the sea, alongside some waders, also floating in the sea..... if I put them on in the sea you say that I would suddenly be dragged to my death ?

of course I would not, the laws of physics don't work like that.

old wives' tales myth and legend do though.

dontcatchmuch

Post by dontcatchmuch »

wadders full of water ,whats right or wrong all i know is id rather try climbing out of the water with them empty than with then full of water and i think that is what joli was refering to in general just the same as a flotation suit being done up tight arond you youll float unzip it a bit and let it fill with water and then try climbing out of the water so lets not be silly and nit pick each other espesily on a topic as inportant as this is SAFTY after all is what comes first

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tensenervoushaddock
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Post by tensenervoushaddock »

the myth is that waders will pull you straight to your death.... taking your shoes or boots off will increase your heat loss rate in cold water and give you problems when you try to climb out with cut feet etc....

obviously if your waders are full of water when you try to climb out you would do something about it....then... it's only when you are out of the water that they will weigh heavily.

I imagine the RNLI know exactly how to get you into their boat, your waders too.

sorry to be pedantic but mistaken advice based on myth is not what is needed to be safe.

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