Worm Beds

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rabbi2
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Worm Beds

Post by rabbi2 » Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:17 am

During my trip last year to Scotland I was suprised just how plentiful Lugworm are. When compared to beaches in the Northwest and other venues it makes them look barren. The same goes for Ragworm as most reach maturity before being collected and are therefore alowed to breed.
Below is a typical example of the beaches in Scotland and the amount of worm that they hold

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It certainly makes you wonder if the demand will outstip the supply, or should we be using an alternative bait such as Mussel, Clams. Mackerel. Bluey and squid?

It follows that the more lug collected near the foreshore the less likely for the fish to come in close to feed as there is very little for them to feed on. Perhaps this is one of the reasons that up to 20 fish were caught in one session back in the 60's and 70's and on less sophisticated gear than we have at the present time.

Your thoughts appreciated.
Cheers
keith :D :D



Iknowagoodplaice
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Post by Iknowagoodplaice » Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:33 am

Here in the South the lug beds generally seem pretty good, but ragworm are heavily dug, presumably because this is the main bait sold in tackle shops. Whether overdug beds keeps the fish further offshore I'm not sure, though the general poor fishing these days is mainly down to overfishing I think.

Given that fishing is generally poor, one would expect rag sales to have dropped enough to allow beds to recover; I suppose enough anglers still go out, despite the low catches. Should fishing ever pick up, perhaps all worm beds will suffer more in future.

eccles
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Post by eccles » Fri Oct 12, 2012 10:41 am

Maybe the worms have more beds in Scotland cos being colder up there they like to be well tucked up at night.

whitbydiver
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Post by whitbydiver » Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:20 pm

love youre reply eccles lol but i think it is because a lot of the beaches up this way are protected due to the wildlife and torags trashing them by digging and leaving them like mine fields as far as the fishing goes i think its water temp in that it is higher these days so the fish ave moved to colder deeper water .


or maybe we ave just cleaned up too much as yrs ago allsorts of crap was dumped into our rivers and seas, and fish were plentiful so maybe just not enough to attract them into shallower waters who knows im no expert.

cheers.
sean.

rabbi2
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Post by rabbi2 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 8:06 am

Hi Sean, Just as you say perhaps we have cleaned up too much as years ago tons of offal was dumped at sea for the fish to feeed on. Another way might be the introduction of man made reefs similar to what the States have done using old tyres.and such like.
Cheers
keith :D :D

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Post by colinthefish » Sat Oct 13, 2012 9:02 am

Dont think there is a simple answer to this one - more a combination of answers.

Artificial reefs for one plus a ban on the big factory trawlers - lets return to smaller local fishing boats and having a simpler weight limit on the catch rather than seeing fish returned to the water dead. And whilst I dont feel the quality is as good, farmed rag offers a more sustainable bait solution.

the list of things we need to do to sustain and improve our fishing is endless - sadly the politicians (and the French) will never implement such actions

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Post by Iknowagoodplaice » Sat Oct 13, 2012 10:05 am

Yes, there is more than one factor, though I think there is little doubt that the overwhelming one is overexploitation: all surveys show fish stocks are much lower than years ago, hence the lack of fish.

However, last year boats off the south coast did fairly well with cod, but few were caught off the shore. Of course, in a boat you can sit on the hotspots: still doesn't mean there is suddenly a huge increase in the cod population, although fish stocks can exhibit this kind of explosive change in numbers.

But the reasons for fish to come close inshore have not changed: the bed is still stirred up in shallow water, and worms still live there.

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Post by smallfry » Sun Oct 14, 2012 11:30 am

it is an interesting one as i fish round chapl and skeg and there's not any real big worm beds around, they are there but not any great quantity, but the fish do come quite close, maybe there are other food sorces around that draw them in even though worm is possibly the staple diet of most speicie.

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