Bass Sizes.

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SimonV
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Bass Sizes.

Post by SimonV » Fri Jun 08, 2012 11:43 am

Hi all,
I know what the min keep size is for Bass but i have been reading about the min size should be increased and i have also been reading about certain sizes are to big and should be release. So what are your views on what size Bass should be kept and what should be released.



rabbi2
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Post by rabbi2 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 11:51 am

I think common sense should prevail on all fish minimum sizes. If fish are to be kept for the table then it should be large enough to make a decent meal for two, otherwise return it for the future.
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wannacatch1
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Post by wannacatch1 » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:15 pm

Hi simon how r u m8y.I keep anything between 3 and 5 lb anything else goes back.Dont take alot home lol.


DAZ ;)

The bloke that caught that 19lb at dungie just stupid to take a fish of that magnitude. :((

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Post by eccles » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:49 pm

I more or less agree with wannacatch except I stretch it a bit and go for 2 to 7 lbs for dinner. I have yet to take a double figure bass and my tackle shop man says he never has in 35 years so they are pretty rare but also prime breeding stock so must be returned.

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Post by wannacatch1 » Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:43 am

As you say reel wizard if it,s legal you have every right to take it,but a 10lb fish is in it,s prime and maybe half way through it,s life far from a granny ;)

DAZ

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Post by nthendpompey » Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:38 pm

prime eating fish are 3-4lb fish.can not see in any sense what so ever taking a fish for the table above that weight is just going to be put in the freezer and forgotten about.freezer burnt,i aint eating that ,in the bin i dont care attiude.
keep to the min sizes t,take home for the plate .
when the bass stocks run out dont blame the trawlers etc if you cant help.
by returnining fish,.
rant over .
mick

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Post by nthendpompey » Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:04 pm

7lb to 11lb has got to be prime breeding stock.when bass can grow.and breed to over to 20lbs a 13lber aint no grannie

my own ,nothing to do with the forum,please dont take anything thats above the legal limit .have your sport and release,one for the table is fine.
these are breeding stock ,and they have surviveid

rabbi2
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Post by rabbi2 » Sat Jun 09, 2012 10:45 pm

The top and bottom of the argument is that providing it is above the legal limit it is up to the individual to take whatever he or she likes.

You cannot impose your opinions on others, however you can express them.

This topic has been debated before with no positive outcome and I suppose it will raise its head again sometime in the future.

The thing is to fish the way you like but keeping in mind conservation and I don't think you will go far wrong.
Cheers
keith :D :D

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Post by Iknowagoodplaice » Sun Jun 10, 2012 11:38 am

This is a complex issue. We can reduce it to a simple question of the law, but as sea anglers with a very keen interest in good fish stocks we should think about the matter more widely.

The B.A.S.S website has some useful information on this http://ukbass.com/how-you-can-help/

There is a reasonable amount of research on the dynamics of bass populations. Bass don't breed till they're around 40cm, so fish on the legal limit will not have added to the population. The bigger fish, fairly obviously, produce more eggs, and they help to buffer populations in poor breeding years. This is a general feature of all populations: a lack of mature individuals increases population instability, which means stocks can collapse easily (and we've seen that with other fish species).

So the upshot is we should not keep 36cm fish, nor the much bigger ones. In reality, keeping a few 36 - 40cm fish a year (should you actually catch a few - I haven't for ages) will have little impact. Likewise, killing the odd big fish, especially one near 20lb, likely at the end of its natural life, will make little difference either.

But I think where anglers can do real damage are those in boats who hit upon a shoal of double figure fish and kill the lot (I know of this happening through a skipper). Personally I am a strong advocate of catch and release, not least because of my interest in wild trout, which benefit from that policy. It's not quite the same with sea fish and I will keep some fish to eat. But one of the wonderful aspects of sea fishing is that it is wild fishing - none of this artificial stocked stuff - and we should all be very interested in making it better. To use a quote I made elsewhere: we are now at the stage where we have to put back more than we take out.

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Post by wannacatch1 » Sun Jun 10, 2012 12:52 pm

Iknowagoodplaice wrote:This is a complex issue. We can reduce it to a simple question of the law, but as sea anglers with a very keen interest in good fish stocks we should think about the matter more widely.

The B.A.S.S website has some useful information on this http://ukbass.com/how-you-can-help/

There is a reasonable amount of research on the dynamics of bass populations. Bass don't breed till they're around 40cm, so fish on the legal limit will not have added to the population. The bigger fish, fairly obviously, produce more eggs, and they help to buffer populations in poor breeding years. This is a general feature of all populations: a lack of mature individuals increases population instability, which means stocks can collapse easily (and we've seen that with other fish species).

With you 100% on that m8 ;)

So the upshot is we should not keep 36cm fish, nor the much bigger ones. In reality, keeping a few 36 - 40cm fish a year (should you actually catch a few - I haven't for ages) will have little impact. Likewise, killing the odd big fish, especially one near 20lb, likely at the end of its natural life, will make little difference either.

But I think where anglers can do real damage are those in boats who hit upon a shoal of double figure fish and kill the lot (I know of this happening through a skipper). Personally I am a strong advocate of catch and release, not least because of my interest in wild trout, which benefit from that policy. It's not quite the same with sea fish and I will keep some fish to eat. But one of the wonderful aspects of sea fishing is that it is wild fishing - none of this artificial stocked stuff - and we should all be very interested in making it better. To use a quote I made elsewhere: we are now at the stage where we have to put back more than we take out.

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