Advise please

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beyenyamin
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Advise please

Post by beyenyamin »

I'm fairly new to fishing and was hoping i could get some advice on a couple of areas.

Mostly i'm fishing from the beach or sea walls in the Portsmouth area using a beach caster with 6oz grip weight and 2 or 3 hook flappers.

What i want to know is, when i'm getting bites what is the best way to hook the fish, do i let it nibble for a while and hope that it hooks itself or should i try striking or something else.

Also i've had a few fish swallow quite a lot of hook, i'm using sizes 2/0 and 4/0, what is the easiest and best way to degauge doing least possible harm to the fish.

One last thing, how often approx is it advisable to change your bait.

Thanks in advance for any info/tips.

Tight lines

Ben



mickallton
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Post by mickallton »

Hi

Two schools of thought on this i let the bite develop like this see the tip move, watch the tip it moves again after the third tip movement i take the rod wind down any slack line then lifted the rod not a striking movement just lift the rod. Some would say strike but i always think there is a chance you will pull the hooks and bait away from the fish and by the way i see some strike im surprised they dont just reel in a set of lips.

There are a number of ways:

1. Buy and learn how to use a disgorger.
2. Place your finger in the fishes mouth put your finger in the hook gap the curved part and push.
3. Probaly the best way is to cut ur hook line as near the hook as possible and leave the hook in the hook will eventualy rust away.

I tend to change baits every 15/20 mins as the the idea is for the scent to attract fish after 15/20 mins the scent has been washed out. Also a rougher sea can wash the bait out quicker.

Other factors:

Crabs and whiting can strip bait quite quickly if the bait is not secured onto the hooks properly ensuring the hook points are not covered so that they catch fish. Empty hooks wont catch fish. Saying that i know one lad who fishes with limited bait mainly because he doesnt buy it but borrows a few bits of all of us then makes up one big bait and leaves it ot for up to an hour and has had some success so who knows.

eccles
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Post by eccles »

Tend to agree with Mick, at this time of year I tend to put out two rigs. One with size 2/0 hooks for chance of bigger stuff (whiting/bass/codling) and another with size 2 or 4 hooks for the dabs/flounder. If I start finding dabs, I change to both rigs wih small hooks in hopes of finding more. I must say that size 4/0 hooks are a bit too big in my view, that's the size to use later in the year when large bass and smoothounds are likely to be around.

mickallton
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Post by mickallton »

I tend to do the same eccles with hooks sizes although i ve had greedy whiting and dabs that have taken size 4/0 meant for cod. But the theory was little fish cant take the bigger hooks meant for big fish but little hooks can take big fish.

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Post by andy1_i »

generally most sea-fish will hook themselves,this is done i think with tidal action,you dont see long-liners striking their fish lol. i have to concur with mick though,sometimes a gentle strike can and does help,beyeyamin can i ask you if you are mostly used to coarse fishing?.

as for removing hooks you could always try long nose pliers/forceps,or even barbless hooks.

and waiting for more positive movements on your rod tip,cos sometimes those fishies will just nibble,i used to strike at every movement on my rod tip when i first started,once you get some more experience you do tend to tell the difference (even on a windy day) :D :D :D

all the best fella

Andy1i

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Post by joliroger »

Hi Ben,
Agree with what the other guys have come up with ;) re. bait my opinion change every 10-15 mins or in the first instance check it !!!!!! if its not touched, well adapt to the circumstances .........leave a while longer but remember the fish feed by scent and if the bait has been in for too long most of the scent trail is exausted!!!!!. :-O
with regards to hook extraction iv'e got a 'Gemini T' bar it does take a deal of getting used to and it is one of the better instruments on the market, recently iv'e purchased a 'Larchy' haven't had the chance to use it yet but it does look the best to do the job so far as i hate to kill fish when its not necessary and would do all I can to return them okay.

All the best JOLI

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Post by scoob8254 »

i agree with the guys above, i think reeling in your slack line then lifting your rod is enough, i dont think its like course fishing where u need to strike to set your hook, sea fish do tend to hook themselfs.

as for bite detection, if its big double thump like you get with cod or other big fish then ill generaly strike straight away (lift my rod :P ) if its more of a nibble where your rod end just shudders then i generaly leave these unless it does it 2 or 3 times in quick succession, after a while you tend to get a feel for whats a propper bite and whats not.

as for unhooking, i dont think you can go far wrong with a big pair of forcepps, can get 12" forceps off ebay for a few quid, much prefer the forceps over my spring loaded disgorger pliers, hardly ever use them tbh, only when the hooks that far down i cant see it to get the forceps on it

bendy rods
scoob

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Post by beyenyamin »

Cool well thanks for the info guys,

I think i'm on the right track anyways, been changing bait every 15-20 mins, and mostly letting them nibble unless i'm sure it's a good bite, it's nice to have that confirmed by some experienced guys though.

As for disgauging i think i'm going to have to invest in some kind of implement to make it easier (are there always going to be a few casualties?)

I got some bluey to try tonight, any of you guys had a go??
I'll let you know how it fairs.

Thanks all, good luck ;)

Ben

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Post by mickallton »

Think when Bluey's first came on the market everybody went berserk on it, some anglers did their own trials fishing one rod with Bluey and another with other baits and reckon Bluey outfished other baits. Bluey id just and oily fish bait just like mackerel the jury is still out with me on it havent found ive caught anymore or less so who knows. Does no harm to try its all about experimentation find how far or close in the fish are, try a mixture of baits on there own or in a cocktail scale hooks up or down, small baits big baits, differant rigs to see what the fish are taking once you find the fish stick that bait, rig, distance on that rod and then experiment on the other rod.

andy1_i
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Post by andy1_i »

some good advice there mick,i might even take some of that onboard myself.

Andy1i

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Post by mickallton »

All that advice watch me blank this weekend lol.

rabbi2
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Post by rabbi2 »

Don't forget Herring as a good standby bait aswell.
Cheers
keith :D :D

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celticcatch
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Post by celticcatch »

andy1_i wrote:generally most sea-fish will hook themselves,this is done i think with tidal action,you dont see long-liners striking their fish lol. i

Andy1i
Long liners use circle hooks not J hooks.


I don't strike all the time..infact about 75% of the time I just wind down, break the weight out and reel in. Unhooking fish I just use my hands even on doggies. If i was dealing with conger and tope then I'd probably use a T bar :P . 'T bars' DONT work on deep hooked fish. Match the hook size to the fish you think are in the area....use circles or even bronzed hooks.

rabbi2
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Post by rabbi2 »

I was given to understand that Long lining was outlawed some time ago.

In my opinion it's cruel and barbaric to leave a fish on a hook 4 to 5 hours and should be discouraged in all fishing circles.

As for using circle hooks, Mustard made specific hooks for long lining but have now ceased production of the same
Cheers
keith :D :D

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celticcatch
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Post by celticcatch »

I don't know anything about them being outlawed rabbi2.
(I saw an episode of 'matt and mitchs big fish' a few weeks ago and they were out on a long liner so...maybe they are still out there? Still... i'd prefer them do it than beam trawl if i'm honest. Less destructive and more selective)


These are the circles I use http://www.oceantacklestore.co.uk/image ... 00x500.jpg Sakuma 440s.

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